Blog Entries

my heart comes undone: Digital Release!

March 15th, 2017

 

My arrangement of composer Judah Adashi’s my heart comes undone for electric guitar and loop pedal is now available digitally on Spotify, YouTube, Amazon and everywhere you download music.  What’s even more exciting is that you can download this recording for free by signing up for my email updates on the right sidebar of my website. The recording will be delivered to your inbox for download.

Progress is never a straight line:

A little over a year ago, I contacted my friend and colleague at Peabody, Judah Adashi, about a piece he’d recently written: my heart comes undone. I was familiar with the string ensemble version of this work that was commissioned and premiered by the Peabody  Preparatory Strings Department and had become acquainted with the version he made for solo cello and loop pedal that was premiered and recorded by Lavena Johanson.

At that time, I was preparing to launch the Laptop Tour and asked him if he’d be open to me creating a version of the piece for solo electric guitar and loop pedal for the tour. While I had always played the electric throughout my life, I never worked with the instrument regularly for music I was to perform in concert and I craved the challenge. The Laptop Tour felt like a perfect place for me to share this piece.

As I set to work, several discoveries were made:

  1. The guitar is NOT the cello or any other bowed instrument.
  2. The quest for the perfect tone on an electric guitar is a challenging task that requires as much focus, detail, and study as creating it on a classical guitar.
  3. Working with a loop pedal shows you at your best and your worst…in the beginning you hear yourself primarily at your worst.
  4. Key Signatures are important (more on that in a minute).

There was a learning curve.  I had to figure out a way to make the long lines of each part sustain and connect similarly to that of a bowed instrument while still remaining true to the guitar.  Also, how could I create a sound that was as full as a cello and yet as clear and transparent as I imagined in my head?  You can hear my early attempts at this here.  My setup was simple: Guitar + Tube Screamer TS9 (that’s an effect pedal—yeah, I like the name, too) + Loop Pedal + Amplifier = Sound.

The result was clear and focused but felt a little thin, at times gritty, and uneven across the guitar. I was getting some of what I imagined though I felt I had more work ahead of me. While navigating the sound, I was knee deep in the owner’s manual of my loop pedal. I had spent a good bit of time with this device performing Ingram Marshall’s Soe-pa but Judah’s piece was going to require a new level of study and experimentation. My first efforts revealed how much of an art there is to creating a perfect loop. For those not familiar with what a loop is, click here. If my early loops were a layered cake, mine was lopsided and leaning towards the right. But with a little practice and willingness to pick myself back up when I toppled over, I managed to count my way towards a cohesive collection of loops that held together.

With my newly acquired skills (and bruises from the learning process), I gave my first performance of Judah’s piece on April 18, 2016. I sent him a note telling him of the performance and shared some clips I made of the work. Judah followed up with me and gently mentioned that the F#’s didn’t seem to be happening in the performance.

“What? What F#’s? No, not possible.” I pulled out the score…yes, indeed possible and true. Key Signatures are important and details are, too.

Armed with this new information (and my father’s voice in the back of my head saying: “We learn by doing…”) I scrapped all my work and started over. As I rolled up my sleeves for another round, I thought about how could I best capture the sound and color that I imagined for this music. What could I do this time to make it more than just an arrangement for the guitar? I wanted to make this work feel as though it was written for my instrument. Enter musician/recording guru Ed Tetrault. In speaking with Ed about recording Judah’s piece he brought a level of creativity that was extraordinary. Ed helped me reimagine my approach to the piece and in the process brought out a serious amount of guitar gear. My rig for the recording became: Guitar + volume pedal + compressor/tone + reverb +  delay + amp 1 + amp 2 + amp 3 + leslie speaker.

This process was transformative and Ed worked with me to create a sound that matches the one I imagined all these months ago and has reshaped the way I perform the piece so that it feels like it belongs to the guitar.  You can see the recording process of this piece here and preparations for the most recent live performance at the Mansion at Strathmore here.

This has been my journey, thus far, with Judah’s piece.  As I’ve taken the time to get to know Judah’s work, I wanted everyone to have the chance to meet him, to learn about how this piece came to be, the significance that February 14th holds for this work, what inspired him to create it, and about his process as an artist.  Our Q & A is below:

Zane: Can you talk about your work as a composer and how you came to write, my heart comes undone?  What was the inspiration?

Judah: My recent work explores two intersections that especially interest me: the intersection between classical music and pop music, and the intersection between music and social justice (as in my piece Rise). I try to write music that is clear and direct, so that the emphasis is not on the music itself but on the opportunity to enter into a particular psychological or emotional space. Every listener’s experience will be different, but I consider it my job to create a musical narrative that invites them into and guides them through this figurative space.

my heart comes undone was commissioned by the Peabody Preparatory Strings Department, directed by my colleague Rebecca Henry, for its outstanding Pre-Conservatory Violin Program (PCVP). I asked Rebecca if I could conceive the music so that it could also be a surprise Valentine’s Day gift for my then-girlfriend, now-wife Lavena Johanson to play on cello with a loop pedal. Rebecca graciously supported this idea, and I gave music to PCVP and to Lavena on Valentine’s Day 2014, three years before your release! They premiered the respective versions in early April of that year (you can listen to them here and here).

The piece was inspired by my wish to write something that presented new challenges to the PCVP violinists, by way of its contrast with their characteristically virtuosic repertoire. It was also inspired by my relationship with Lavena, which took a long time to develop (for various reasons, nearly two years elapsed between our first meeting and our first date!), and by her cello playing, in particular the experience of listening to her practice long, slow scales.

Zane: One of the first things I noticed when studying your score was this quote you placed within the piece by Rainer Maria Rilke. “We don’t accomplish our love in a single year as the flowers do.” Could you talk about the significance of this text?

Judah: I had read and admired Rilke’s poetry for many years, but I wasn’t familiar this particular line, from his Duino Elegies. I discovered it in my horoscope (Sagittarius!), specifically Rob Breszny’s Free Will Astrology, published in the Baltimore City Paper. Rilke’s words resonated with the gradual unfolding of the music and of my relationship with Lavena.

Zane: You mention that this work was inspired by the music of Arvo Part and Bjork’s “Unravel,” could you talk a bit about how their works inspired this piece?  What did you draw upon from Bjork’s song, a vocal line, lyric, or texture within the recording?

Judah: my heart comes undone doesn’t draw anything specific from Arvo Pärt’s music, but is inspired by some of its distinctive qualities: its patience, and its use of repetition. I took my title from Björk’s “Unravel” (the full lyric is “while you are away/ my heart comes undone / slowly unravels/ in a ball of yarn”). The repeating motive, almost a harmonic progression, that forms the basis for “Unravel” is the musical starting point for my heart comes undone. What I feel close to in the work of both of these artists is their ability to create beautiful, simple sound worlds that are at once intimate and expansive.

Zane: What motivated you to create a piece that could be played either by an ensemble, soloist, or soloist with an ensemble?

Judah: This was my first attempt at an open instrumentation. It’s not a new concept: whether by design or evolving performance practice, there are works (for example, Bach’s Art of the Fugue) that can be realized by many different instruments/voices or combinations of instruments/voices. Every piece of music has a life of its own once it’s finished, insofar as different performers will bring their own interpretive instincts to it. In this case, there is also latitude in terms of who might want to play the music, whether by themselves (an option afforded by the technology of the loop pedal) or with others.

Zane: What was your process for creating the piece?  How did you navigate constructing a work that can be performed both by an ensemble or soloist?  What did you discover in working to build this kind of flexibility within the score?

Judah: I place a premium on writing music that is technically, albeit not expressively, simple. Contemporary classical music is often conceived in very particular, meticulous ways for certain instruments or voices. My approach tends to be more aligned with songwriting, writing music that I think could have a life in different contexts and versions. In my heart comes undone, I made a point of using basic materials (long, slow scales) in a limited range, so that the music could work on many instruments.

The piece is structured as a series of layered repetitions. The bottom two lines, scales a major sixth apart (Björk’s motive occurs in the first two measures of the bottom two voices), repeat throughout the piece, while the upper lines take turns introducing new ideas. To ensure that the piece would work for a soloist with a loop pedal, only one thing could change at a time, from one 7-measure phrase to the next. I had to keep that limitation in mind while also making sure that the music never felt static. I wanted the texture to unfold in an organic and convincing way.

Zane: Is this your first piece that has the option of utilizing technology? If so, has it been a positive experience?  Was there a learning curve? If not, what other pieces have you or are you writing that use technology?

Judah: I wrote a piece called Inner City in 2013, for piano and pre-recorded audio, primarily field recordings made in Baltimore. I used a Zoom H4N to make the recordings, and a digital audio workstation called Reaper to edit them. It was a totally new experience for me. On one hand, there was something liberating about working with so much found material. On the other hand, I felt as though I was writing two pieces simultaneously — one for piano, one purely electronic — even before I got to the challenges of integrating them effectively.

There was absolutely a learning curve, from concept to premiere, in making Inner City match the sonic landscape I imagined in my head. I benefited from the wisdom of my friend Matthew Sullivan on Inner City, and he advised me on the solo version of my heart comes undone as well. At first, Matthew designed a patch using Max, a visual programming language, to trigger the various loops. Lavena ultimately opted to perform the piece as you do, with a loop pedal, which creates more demands on the player but also affords them greater control.

I’m currently working on a piece called Unseen that mixes samples of spoken text with live and looped vocals.

Zane: Since the premiere of this piece for both string ensemble and solo cello, could you talk about the other artists and ensembles that have approached you about this work?

It’s been such a joy to see the piece taken up by a variety of musicians — people who have approached me, or to whom I’ve reached out — since that openness was integral to the initial concept. To date, it’s been performed by Caroline Shaw, on viola with loop pedal; by Liam Byrne on viola da gamba with loop pedal; and in unusual combinations (especially by loadbang: (bass clarinet, trumpet, trombone, and baritone voice!). Guitarist Giacomo Fiore has made a very different recording from yours, to be released next month on Paper Garden Records, with his own arrangement of the Beatles “Because” as the B-side.

This spring, the brand-new Peabody String Sinfonia, an ensemble devoted to community engagement in Baltimore, will play my heart comes undone in performances centered around mental illness, autism, and addiction recovery for the homeless. Finally, in June, the vocal group Roomful of Teeth will be recording the piece at The Tank in Colorado. I’m incredibly grateful to you and to all of these other artists for spending time with my music, and for bringing so many of their own ideas and insights to it!

Zane: What are your current projects that you’re developing?

Judah: The piece I mentioned above, Unseen, is a major focus right now; that work tells the tragic story of Kalief Browder. I’m also working on a percussion quartet, and a couple of choral pieces.

Zane: How can people find you on the internet?

Judah: I’m at judahadashi.com, and on social media: @jadashi on Twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud, and @judahadashi on Facebook and YouTube.

my heart comes undone by Judah Adashi

February 14th, 2017

Happy Valentine’s Day! As we celebrate this day of love, hope, and at times longing, I want to share with you a new recording I’ve made that beautifully captures all of these elements by composer Judah Adashi.  You can download my arrangement of his piece, my heart comes undone, for solo electric guitar by signing up for my email updates on the right sidebar of my website. The recording will be delivered to your inbox for download.

Progress is never a straight line:

A little over a year ago, I contacted my friend and colleague at Peabody, Judah Adashi, about a piece he’d recently written: my heart comes undone. I was familiar with the string ensemble version of this work that was commissioned and premiered by the Peabody  Preparatory Strings Department and had become acquainted with the version he made for solo cello and loop pedal that was premiered and recorded by Lavena Johanson.

At that time, I was preparing to launch the Laptop Tour and asked him if he’d be open to me creating a version of the piece for solo electric guitar and loop pedal for the tour. While I had always played the electric throughout my life, I never worked with the instrument regularly for music I was to perform in concert and I craved the challenge. The Laptop Tour felt like a perfect place for me to share this piece.

As I set to work, several discoveries were made:

  1. The guitar is NOT the cello or any other bowed instrument.
  2. The quest for the perfect tone on an electric guitar is a challenging task that requires as much focus, detail, and study as creating it on a classical guitar.
  3. Working with a loop pedal shows you at your best and your worst…in the beginning you hear yourself primarily at your worst.
  4. Key Signatures are important (more on that in a minute).

There was a learning curve.  I had to figure out a way to make the long lines of each part sustain and connect similarly to that of a bowed instrument while still remaining true to the guitar.  Also, how could I create a sound that was as full as a cello and yet as clear and transparent as I imagined in my head?  You can hear my early attempts at this here.  My setup was simple: Guitar + Tube Screamer TS9 (that’s an effect pedal—yeah, I like the name, too) + Loop Pedal + Amplifier = Sound.

The result was clear and focused but felt a little thin, at times gritty, and uneven across the guitar. I was getting some of what I imagined though I felt I had more work ahead of me. While navigating the sound, I was knee deep in the owner’s manual of my loop pedal. I had spent a good bit of time with this device performing Ingram Marshall’s Soe-pa but Judah’s piece was going to require a new level of study and experimentation. My first efforts revealed how much of an art there is to creating a perfect loop. For those not familiar with what a loop is, click here. If my early loops were a layered cake, mine was lopsided and leaning towards the right. But with a little practice and willingness to pick myself back up when I toppled over, I managed to count my way towards a cohesive collection of loops that held together.

With my newly acquired skills (and bruises from the learning process), I gave my first performance of Judah’s piece on April 18, 2016. I sent him a note telling him of the performance and shared some clips I made of the work. Judah followed up with me and gently mentioned that the F#’s didn’t seem to be happening in the performance.

“What? What F#’s? No, not possible.” I pulled out the score…yes, indeed possible and true. Key Signatures are important and details are, too.

Armed with this new information (and my father’s voice in the back of my head saying: “We learn by doing…”) I scrapped all my work and started over. As I rolled up my sleeves for another round, I thought about how could I best capture the sound and color that I imagined for this music. What could I do this time to make it more than just an arrangement for the guitar? I wanted to make this work feel as though it was written for my instrument. Enter musician/recording guru Ed Tetrault. In speaking with Ed about recording Judah’s piece he brought a level of creativity that was extraordinary. Ed helped me reimagine my approach to the piece and in the process brought out a serious amount of guitar gear. My rig for the recording became: Guitar + volume pedal + compressor/tone + reverb +  delay + amp 1 + amp 2 + amp 3 + leslie speaker.

This process was transformative and Ed worked with me to create a sound that matches the one I imagined all these months ago and has reshaped the way I perform the piece so that it feels like it belongs to the guitar.  You can see the recording process of this piece here and preparations for the most recent live performance at the Mansion at Strathmore here.

This has been my journey, thus far, with Judah’s piece.  As I’ve taken the time to get to know Judah’s work, I wanted everyone to have the chance to meet him, to learn about how this piece came to be, the significance that February 14th holds for this work, what inspired him to create it, and about his process as an artist.  Our Q & A is below:

Zane: Can you talk about your work as a composer and how you came to write, my heart comes undone?  What was the inspiration?

Judah: My recent work explores two intersections that especially interest me: the intersection between classical music and pop music, and the intersection between music and social justice (as in my piece Rise). I try to write music that is clear and direct, so that the emphasis is not on the music itself but on the opportunity to enter into a particular psychological or emotional space. Every listener’s experience will be different, but I consider it my job to create a musical narrative that invites them into and guides them through this figurative space.

my heart comes undone was commissioned by the Peabody Preparatory Strings Department, directed by my colleague Rebecca Henry, for its outstanding Pre-Conservatory Violin Program (PCVP). I asked Rebecca if I could conceive the music so that it could also be a surprise Valentine’s Day gift for my then-girlfriend, now-wife Lavena Johanson to play on cello with a loop pedal. Rebecca graciously supported this idea, and I gave music to PCVP and to Lavena on Valentine’s Day 2014, three years before your release! They premiered the respective versions in early April of that year (you can listen to them here and here).

The piece was inspired by my wish to write something that presented new challenges to the PCVP violinists, by way of its contrast with their characteristically virtuosic repertoire. It was also inspired by my relationship with Lavena, which took a long time to develop (for various reasons, nearly two years elapsed between our first meeting and our first date!), and by her cello playing, in particular the experience of listening to her practice long, slow scales.

Zane: One of the first things I noticed when studying your score was this quote you placed within the piece by Rainer Maria Rilke. “We don’t accomplish our love in a single year as the flowers do.” Could you talk about the significance of this text?

Judah: I had read and admired Rilke’s poetry for many years, but I wasn’t familiar this particular line, from his Duino Elegies. I discovered it in my horoscope (Sagittarius!), specifically Rob Breszny’s Free Will Astrology, published in the Baltimore City Paper. Rilke’s words resonated with the gradual unfolding of the music and of my relationship with Lavena.

Zane: You mention that this work was inspired by the music of Arvo Part and Bjork’s “Unravel,” could you talk a bit about how their works inspired this piece?  What did you draw upon from Bjork’s song, a vocal line, lyric, or texture within the recording?

Judah: my heart comes undone doesn’t draw anything specific from Arvo Pärt’s music, but is inspired by some of its distinctive qualities: its patience, and its use of repetition. I took my title from Björk’s “Unravel” (the full lyric is “while you are away/ my heart comes undone / slowly unravels/ in a ball of yarn”). The repeating motive, almost a harmonic progression, that forms the basis for “Unravel” is the musical starting point for my heart comes undone. What I feel close to in the work of both of these artists is their ability to create beautiful, simple sound worlds that are at once intimate and expansive.

Zane: What motivated you to create a piece that could be played either by an ensemble, soloist, or soloist with an ensemble?

Judah: This was my first attempt at an open instrumentation. It’s not a new concept: whether by design or evolving performance practice, there are works (for example, Bach’s Art of the Fugue) that can be realized by many different instruments/voices or combinations of instruments/voices. Every piece of music has a life of its own once it’s finished, insofar as different performers will bring their own interpretive instincts to it. In this case, there is also latitude in terms of who might want to play the music, whether by themselves (an option afforded by the technology of the loop pedal) or with others.

Zane: What was your process for creating the piece?  How did you navigate constructing a work that can be performed both by an ensemble or soloist?  What did you discover in working to build this kind of flexibility within the score?

Judah: I place a premium on writing music that is technically, albeit not expressively, simple. Contemporary classical music is often conceived in very particular, meticulous ways for certain instruments or voices. My approach tends to be more aligned with songwriting, writing music that I think could have a life in different contexts and versions. In my heart comes undone, I made a point of using basic materials (long, slow scales) in a limited range, so that the music could work on many instruments.

The piece is structured as a series of layered repetitions. The bottom two lines, scales a major sixth apart (Björk’s motive occurs in the first two measures of the bottom two voices), repeat throughout the piece, while the upper lines take turns introducing new ideas. To ensure that the piece would work for a soloist with a loop pedal, only one thing could change at a time, from one 7-measure phrase to the next. I had to keep that limitation in mind while also making sure that the music never felt static. I wanted the texture to unfold in an organic and convincing way.

Zane: Is this your first piece that has the option of utilizing technology? If so, has it been a positive experience?  Was there a learning curve? If not, what other pieces have you or are you writing that use technology?

Judah: I wrote a piece called Inner City in 2013, for piano and pre-recorded audio, primarily field recordings made in Baltimore. I used a Zoom H4N to make the recordings, and a digital audio workstation called Reaper to edit them. It was a totally new experience for me. On one hand, there was something liberating about working with so much found material. On the other hand, I felt as though I was writing two pieces simultaneously — one for piano, one purely electronic — even before I got to the challenges of integrating them effectively.

There was absolutely a learning curve, from concept to premiere, in making Inner City match the sonic landscape I imagined in my head. I benefited from the wisdom of my friend Matthew Sullivan on Inner City, and he advised me on the solo version of my heart comes undone as well. At first, Matthew designed a patch using Max, a visual programming language, to trigger the various loops. Lavena ultimately opted to perform the piece as you do, with a loop pedal, which creates more demands on the player but also affords them greater control.

I’m currently working on a piece called Unseen that mixes samples of spoken text with live and looped vocals.

Zane: Since the premiere of this piece for both string ensemble and solo cello, could you talk about the other artists and ensembles that have approached you about this work?

It’s been such a joy to see the piece taken up by a variety of musicians — people who have approached me, or to whom I’ve reached out — since that openness was integral to the initial concept. To date, it’s been performed by Caroline Shaw, on viola with loop pedal; by Liam Byrne on viola da gamba with loop pedal; and in unusual combinations (especially by loadbang: (bass clarinet, trumpet, trombone, and baritone voice!). Guitarist Giacomo Fiore has made a very different recording from yours, to be released next month on Paper Garden Records, with his own arrangement of the Beatles “Because” as the B-side.

This spring, the brand-new Peabody String Sinfonia, an ensemble devoted to community engagement in Baltimore, will play my heart comes undone in performances centered around mental illness, autism, and addiction recovery for the homeless. Finally, in June, the vocal group Roomful of Teeth will be recording the piece at The Tank in Colorado. I’m incredibly grateful to you and to all of these other artists for spending time with my music, and for bringing so many of their own ideas and insights to it!

Zane: What are your current projects that you’re developing?

Judah: The piece I mentioned above, Unseen, is a major focus right now; that work tells the tragic story of Kalief Browder. I’m also working on a percussion quartet, and a couple of choral pieces.

Zane: How can people find you on the internet?

Judah: I’m at judahadashi.com, and on social media: @jadashi on Twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud, and @judahadashi on Facebook and YouTube.

 

 

The Quiet Before Christmas Playlist

December 21st, 2016

There is a brief and amazing period of time during the year that I love. It lives in the 3 to 4 days between my last day of teaching or concert and Christmas. It’s quiet in my house in the early hours of the morning (yes, this means I’m awake before the tiny baby) and in the early evening (once she’s conked out for the night). It’s during these few hours, in these few days, where that I am afforded the luxury to sit quietly, think, daydream, pour myself a drink (at night people…coffee in the a.m., bourbon after 7 p.m.) and listen to music (or simply crash out on the couch with the mighty S). And, I’ll admit that I’ve done all of these at the same time as recently as last night.

So, while you may have been inundated with Christmas or looking to escape it, I wanted to share some of my favorite tunes that I enjoy during this all too short spell of time. Here are five songs that I’ve looked forward to visiting as I saw this window of respite approaching.

Wishing you all happy holidays and a wonderful 2017!

PS. Can’t get enough Christmas Music? Not to worry, the Laptop Tour returns on Saturday, December 24 at 7:30 pm (EDT). That’s right, Christmas Eve! So, join me for a few Christmas carols and holiday cheer!  Click here to see the show.

What’s in a Name?

October 26th, 2016

whats-in-a-name

Every morning I make coffee. It’s the first thing I do after getting tiny baby out of her bed and setting her up with a cup of milk to start her day. In all honesty, coffee is a fairly substantial part of my existence. Don’t worry, I drink plenty of water, too. Though it would be fair to say (just ask any of my students or colleagues) that coffee is definitely how I manage to get things accomplished.

The second half of my day involves a pit-stop to a coffee shop to get an Americano in my travel mug. For anyone that is curious, I use a Zojirushi travel thermos and it’s probably the one gift I’ve received in the past year that has changed my life—seriously—the coffee is hot all day. All. Day.

I mention all of this because I must confess something…I have a “coffee shop name.” What’s a coffee shop name you ask? Simple—pick a name that is not yours and use it everywhere when you’re out in public ordering something. You could be Bob at Panera bread, or Willy at the pizza shop. It’s liberating, allows for spontaneity, gives you a small bit of privacy, and if you’re like me, saves you from having this conversation over and over:

Cashier: Can I get a name for your order?

Me: Yes, it’s Zane

Cashier: I’m sorry…what’s your name?

Me: Zane

Cashier: Shane?

Me: Zane…Z. A. N. E.

Cashier: Oooooh…what’s that mean?

Me: I’m not sure… (Now twitching due to being stuck in this conversation loop and becoming aware of the line forming behind me.)

Cashier: You know, I know another Zane. He lived in Phoenix, Arizona…can you believe that?!?!

Me: …..Cool…well, um, thank you.

Cashier: Yeah, man, that’s cool—I’m gonna have to tell him I met you…

Me: (receives coffee with name spelled: Shane)

After having hundreds of these interactions over the last 25 years (particularly during 2012-13 when I was flying almost every week) I became “Chris” at any and all coffee shops, food establishments, and watering holes.  It was great—there was never any confusion, or spelling involved.  I was just simply good ol’ Chris.  You know, Chris—that name that people can spell and that doesn’t need any back and forth.

Cashier: What’s your name, buddy?

Me: Chris.

Cashier: Great, will have that up for you at the end of the bar. Have a great day, Chris.

Me (Internal conversation): Hell, yeah! Chris IS going to have a great day.

And a great day I did have! I was in and out of places in a flash. Sure, they didn’t know my name, but did it really matter? NO! I was polite, paid my bill, and quietly looked out the window or stayed out of the traffic pattern.

This was all going great until my wife and I moved to our current home. Over the course of the past couple years, I have become a daily customer at the coffee shop near my house (Peet’s Coffee and Tea). From the first day I entered, I became Chris and it was business as usual until about 6 weeks ago.

I had just returned from recording (you can read about that here) and a good friend sent me a “Hooray! You finally finished that album coffee card.” Full disclosure, this may be the greatest reward for making anything ever—coffee. In a quest to simplify my life, I downloaded the Peet’s app, as suggested by one of the employees, and set it up so that I could pay with the app. Here’s where I made my fatal mistake. I entered my real name.

I pull into pick up my coffee, “check-in” and pay with the app, and then all hell broke loose:

Cashier: Thanks, Chri….Zane?!?!?

Me: Uh…

Cashier: Wait, I thought your name is Chris?

Barista: What? Wait, what’s going on?

Me: ….

My cover was blown. My identity had been compromised by my own F@#*ing coffee app. Screw wiki-leaks. I was my own damn wiki-leaks.

With my “real name” now out there, I knew there would be questions. It went from bad to worse in a hurry. The next day, the entire staff knew and I received that quiet middle-school “you’re now on the outside” treatment. It started with:

Cashier: Thanks for your order Zane…or whoever you really are…

And quickly moved to:

Barista: So is that little child you bring in here actually yours? Or, is that a fake baby, too?

I went home that night and explained my hangdog expression to the mighty S (that’s my wife) and she thought the entire thing was funny. I asked her why they were so angry and she, in her infinite wisdom, pointed out that they worked to build a relationship with me. They’d gotten to know me (Chris), and that now the person they knew isn’t who they thought. Boom!—it finally hit me. The awesome people at Peet’s actually liked coffee shop me and now they were faced with Zane instead….Yeah, I might be disappointed, too, if that were the case. Sorry guys. It’s not you, it’s me.

She also said I should talk about it in my blog as this truly captures the real me. Yep…feelin’ prittay, prittay good. Or, I should say I’m having a Larry David moment.

Flash forward to now. Things are getting better. Like any relationship that has had a setback it can take a minute to get over it (though they’re not totally over it). I say this with certainty as S went into Peet’s with my phone to pickup a coffee and they said:

Cashier: So who are you, really?

S: Laughter ( I have no idea what she told them.)

Cashier: I know you’re not Chris, and we know you’re not Zane…

What’s the takeaway from all of this? At the moment I’m not sure. I do know I’m not giving up my coffee name. I like it and now it makes S laugh even more than she normally does. All I can hope for in the interim is that the team at Peet’s somehow see’s the humor in all of this and eventually we get back to our usual rhythm but like fixing an error in a piece, it will take some time. Also, in an effort to point out the humor in all of this, I’ve decided I’ll be changing the name in my Peet’s App every week. On Monday I became Jo-Jo…let’s see what that does.

The Beginning of the End

August 10th, 2016

Flying-Machine

It’s been a couple of months since my last post. I needed to shut down the engines for a minute and recharge. Also, I’ve been practicing like a crazy person, but I’ll get into that in a moment.

In August of 2009, I packed up the few boxes of possessions (mainly books and recordings), a table, 2 chairs, and a dresser and placed them in a storage unit for a whopping $150 for the year. A few days later I threw a suitcase with some clothes, a used laptop computer, my guitar, and a couple of notebooks onto a flight to Spain. I would live there for just under a year.

I was on a mission to discover everything I possibly could about one composer in particular: Vicente Asencio. So, I spent a number of months studying his works for the guitar and amassing a collection of Spanish musicology books (all of which made up the contents of my suitcase on the return flight). These books not only created insight into who he was as a composer but also contextualized how his work fitted within the musical times in which he lived. The more I researched him, the more I realized I couldn’t just limit my investigation to solely his pieces. I began to study his contemporaries learning just how this very specific musical landscape had influenced all of them.   As David Byrne explains in his book How Music Works, you have to have “a scene” and if you don’t have one, well, then you’d better build one. Asencio and his colleagues did just that in the 1950s and not much has changed sixty years later. We’re still building our own scenes….but that’s a story for another day.

So after living abroad, and with a memorable Spanish inflected Thanksgiving under my belt, I moved back to Baltimore. Upon my return, the next ten months of my life were divided between teaching the guitar, thinking about Asencio, writing about him and his contemporaries, practicing his music, taking my last couple of qualifying exams, and finishing my degree.   So easy being a student – right?! Ahh, not so much. My wife summed this time up brilliantly when she named it “the grumpy year” and she’s being generous!

After the dust settled, I just couldn’t start the engine back up to push the project forward. Ironically, I felt incredibly guilty about it as I had done all of this work yet could not motivate myself to share it. My research sat in a box in our apartment, and then in a box in our house until finally, in late May of 2014, I became motivated by two deceptively simple sentences: 1. Zane, we’re having a baby. 2. Finish this album. We booked the studio and in October of that same year I went to Berlin, Germany and began recording. The project had finally begun.

This evening, nearly two years later, I’m getting back on a plane to finish the project. Little did I know (or as they say in the film Stranger than Fiction: “Little did he know…”) that it would take me 7 years to reach the finish line.

How do I feel? –Oh, I’m nervous. I find recording to be difficult, and for me it’s a multi-layered challenge, one where I try not to second guess myself, my preparation, my abilities or my musical ideas. I should mention that this is before they’ve even turned on the microphones.

All this is to say—wish me luck. It’s exciting to have the chance to finish this project, and if you’re curious to see how it’s going, I’ll be posting daily to my Instagram account: @zaneforshee.  Stop by and say hello. In the interim, I’ll be thinking about this scene from the movie Almost Famous where Frances McDormand tells the lead guitarist from Stillwater: Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.

Perhaps we could all use a little courage this week.